2018 in spaceflight

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2018 in spaceflight
Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft docking to the ISS.jpg
An artist's rendition shows the CST-100 Starliner capsule undocking from the International Space Station (ISS). Both the Boeing Starliner and the SpaceX Dragon 2 spacecraft are scheduled to carry their first astronauts to the ISS in late 2018.
Orbital launches
First 8 January
Last 18 January
Total 7
Successes 6
Failures 0
Partial failures 1
Catalogued 7
Rockets
Retirements

2018 is expected to bring a number of milestones in spaceflight. The first crewed missions of both CST-100 Starliner and Dragon 2 capsules to the ISS are scheduled to restore American manned spaceflight capabilities, which stopped with the last Space Shuttle flight in 2011. SpaceX plans to send two space tourists on a free return trajectory around the Moon in late 2018, with a Dragon 2 riding a Falcon Heavy rocket.[1] Falcon Heavy, with an expected maiden flight in January,[2] will have the largest payload to Low Earth orbit of all operational rockets. The maiden flight of NASA's Space Launch System has slipped to 2019.[3]

In planetary exploration, the NASA InSight seismology probe is expected to launch and land on Mars within 2018. ESA and JAXA will launch BepiColombo to Mercury, on a 10-year mission featuring several flybys and eventually deploying two orbiters in 2025 for local study. Two asteroid sampling missions Hayabusa 2 and OSIRIS-REx will reach their respective targets Ryugu and Bennu during summer.

China will launch its Chang'e 4 lander/rover in the latter part of the year. The mission was originally designated as a backup of its Chang'e 3 mission but later re-purposed to attempt the first ever soft landing on the far side of the Moon. In 2018 or early 2019 China will also launch the core module Tianhe-1, which is the first of three large modules that will make up the completed Chinese Space Station (CSS).[4] India plans to launch its Chandrayaan-2 lunar orbiter/lander/rover in the first quarter of 2018.[5]

As of January 2018, around 170 orbital launches are planned for this year, almost double the 90 orbital rockets that were launched in 2017. Although the space industry is growing, many of the announced launches will likely slip to 2019.

Orbital launches[edit]

Date and time (UTC) Rocket Launch site LSP
Payload Operator Orbit Function Decay (UTC) Outcome
Remarks

January[edit]

8 January
01:00[8]
United States Falcon 9 Full Thrust United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX
United States Zuma (USA-280)[9] Unnamed U.S. government agency Low Earth Classified 8 January Failure to separate from payload adapter[10]
The Zuma satellite failed to separate from the second stage possibly due to a failure in the payload adapter (provided by Northrop Grumman who manufactured the satellite) and fell back to Earth over the Indian Ocean[6]. SpaceX has maintained that "Falcon 9 did everything correctly on Sunday night"[7].
9 January
03:24[11][12]
China Long March 2D China Taiyuan LC-9 China CASC
China SuperView / Gaojing-1 03 Beijing Space View Technology Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
China SuperView / Gaojing-1 04 Beijing Space View Technology Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
11 January
23:18[13]
China Long March 3B / YZ-1 China Xichang LC-2 China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M7 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
China BeiDou-3 M8 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
12 January[14]
03:58[15]
India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan FLP India ISRO
India Cartosat-2F ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
United Kingdom NovaSAR-S Surrey Satellite Technology Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation (radar) In orbit Operational
United Kingdom Carbonite-2 Surrey Satellite Technology Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
India IITMSAT IIT Madras Low Earth (SSO) Ionospheric research In orbit Operational
United States Arkyd 6A Planetary Resources Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
France PicSat Paris Observatory Low Earth (SSO) Astronomy In orbit Operational
Canada Kepler 1 Kepler Communications Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
South Korea CANYVAL-X 1, 2 Yonsei University, NASA Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
South Korea CNUSail-1 CNU Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
South Korea KAUSAT 5 Korea Aerospace University Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
South Korea SIGMA (KHUSAT 3) Kyung Hee University Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
India Parikshit MIT Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
South Korea STEP Cube Lab Chosun University Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
United States Fox 1D AMSAT Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
United States IRVINE01 Irvine Public School Foundation Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
PSLV-C40 mission successfully carried and deployed 31 satellites.
12 January
22:11[16]
United States Delta IV M+(5,2) United States Vandenberg SLC-6 United States United Launch Alliance
United States NROL-47 / Topaz-5[17] / USA-281 US Air Force LEO (retrograde) Reconnaissance In orbit Operational
Last flight of Delta IV M+(5,2) variant.
13 January
~07:20[18]
China Long March 2D China Jiuquan China CASC
China LKW-3 CAS Low Earth Earth observation In orbit Operational
17 January
21:06:11[19]
Japan Epsilon Japan Uchinoura Japan JAXA
Japan ASNARO-2 NEC Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
19 January [20] China Long March 11 China Jiuquan LA-4/SLS-2[20] China CASC
China Jilin-1 07 CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
China Jilin-1 08 CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
China Huaian CASC Low Earth (SSO) Technology  
China Xiaoxiang 2 Changsha Gaoxinqu Tianyi Research Institute Low Earth (SSO) Stabilization technology  
China Xiaoxiang 3 Changsha Gaoxinqu Tianyi Research Institute Low Earth (SSO) Stabilization technology  
China Xiaoxiang 4 Changsha Gaoxinqu Tianyi Research Institute Low Earth (SSO) Stabilization technology  
China Xiaoxiang 5 Changsha Gaoxinqu Tianyi Research Institute Low Earth (SSO) Stabilization technology  
China Quantutong 1 All Graphic Location Network Co. Low Earth (SSO) Communications  
Canada Kepler 2 Kepler Communications Low Earth (SSO) Communications  
19 January
00:40-01:20[14]
United States Atlas V 411 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States SBIRS GEO-4 U.S. Air Force Geosynchronous Missile warning  
20 January[21]
01:30 - 05:30
New Zealand Electron New Zealand Rocket Lab Launch Complex 1 United States Rocket Lab
Still Testing Rocket Lab Low Earth Orbital flight test  
United States Flock-2 x 2[22] Planet Labs Low Earth Earth observation  
United States Lemur-2 x 2[22] Spire Global Low Earth Earth observation  
25 January [23] United States Falcon Heavy United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster SpaceX Heliocentric (TMI) Flight test  
Re-using two first-stage boosters. Launching the car towards Mars, but it won't enter Mars orbit. Maiden flight of Heavy configuration.
25 January
22:20-23:05[14]
European Union Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
Luxembourg SES-14 / GOLD SES S.A. Geosynchronous Communications  
United Arab Emirates Al Yah-3 Yahsat Geosynchronous Communications  
26 January [24] China Long March 2C China Xichang China CASC
China Yaogan-30 J CAS Low Earth Technology demonstration  
China Yaogan-30 K CAS Low Earth Technology demonstration  
China Yaogan-30 L CAS Low Earth Technology demonstration  
30 January
21:23–23:37[14]
United States Falcon 9 Full Thrust United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX
Luxembourg SES-16 / GovSat-1 SES S.A. Geosynchronous Communications  
Will re-use booster B1032 recovered from the NROL-76 mission in May 2017.[25]
Late January [26] New Zealand Electron New Zealand Rocket Lab Launch Complex 1 United States Rocket Lab
Test Flight 3 Rocket Lab Low Earth Orbital flight test  
United States Outernet 1 Planet Labs Low Earth Communications  
Netherlands Various Cubesats ISILaunch Low Earth  
January (TBD)[14] Japan SS-520 Japan Uchinoura Japan JAXA
Japan TRICOM-1R University of Tokyo Low Earth Technology demonstration  
Re-flight after a launch failure in January 2017

February[edit]

1 February [14]
02:07:18
Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S[27] Russia Roscosmos
Russia Kanopus-V No.3 Roscosmos Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Russia Kanopus-V No.4 Roscosmos Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Germany S-Net 1–4[28] TU Berlin Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration (inter-satellite communications)  
Russia Auriga[29] Dauria Aerospace Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
2 February[24] China Long March 2D[30] China Jiuquan SLS-2 China CASC
China Italy CSES / Zhangheng-1[31] CNSA / ASI Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
China Fengmaniu 1 CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Denmark GOMX 4A GOMSpace, Danish Ministry of Defence Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
Denmark GOMX 4B GOMSpace, ESA Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
Argentina ÑuSat 4 Satellogic Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Argentina ÑuSat 5 Satellogic Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
China Shaonian Xing[32] China Association for Science and Technology Low Earth (SSO) Communications  
10 February
14:22[33]
United States Falcon 9 Full Thrust United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
Spain Paz Hisdesat Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
United States Microsat-2a SpaceX Low Earth Technology Demonstration  
United States Microsat-2b SpaceX Low Earth Technology Demonstration  
Multiple smaller secondary payloads will also launch on the Falcon 9 rocket.
11 February[14]
08:58
Russia Soyuz-2.1a Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress MS-08 / 69P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
15 February[24] China Long March 3B / YZ-1[34] China Xichang China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M5 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
China BeiDou-3 M6 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
25 February
04:00–06:00[35]
Japan H-IIA 202 Japan Tanegashima LA-Y1 Japan MHI
Japan IGS-Optical 6 CSICE Low Earth (SSO) Reconnaissance  
28 February Russia Soyuz-2-1v Russia Plesetsk Russia Roscosmos
Kosmos (number TBD, payload possibly called EMKA)[36] Roscosmos  
Mid February (TBD)[37] United States Falcon 9 Full Thrust United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX
Spain Hispasat 30W-6[38] Hispasat Geosynchronous Communications  
February (TBD)[39][40] United States Falcon 9 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
United States Iridium NEXT 41–50 Iridium Low Earth Communications  
Will re-use a first-stage booster.[39]
February (TBD)[41] India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan FLP India ISRO
India IRNSS-1I ISRO Geosynchronous Navigation  
February (TBD)[24] China Long March 3C / YZ-1 China Xichang China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M9 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
China BeiDou-3 M10 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  

March[edit]

1 March[14] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
Luxembourg O3b × 4 SES S.A. Medium Earth Communications  
1/2 March[14]
22:02-00:02
United States Atlas V 541 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States GOES-S NESDIS Geosynchronous Meteorology  
9 March[36] Russia Soyuz-FG Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz MS-08 / 54S Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 55/56  
Manned flight with three cosmonauts
15 March[36] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia RVSN RF
Russia Blagovest-12L VKS Geosynchronous Communications (military)  
16 March[14] European Union Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
Japan Superbird-B3 / DSN-1 JSAT / DSN / JSDF Geosynchronous Communications  
United Kingdom HYLAS-4 Avanti Geosynchronous Communications  
20 March[14] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States TESS NASA HEO Space observatory  
March (TBD)[14] United States Falcon 9 Full Thrust United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Bangladesh Bangabandhu-1 BTRC Geosynchronous Communications  
March (TBD)[41] India GSLV Mk II India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India Chandrayaan 2 ISRO Selenocentric Lunar orbiter, lander and rover  
March (TBD)[41] India GSLV Mk III India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India GSAT-29 ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
Second orbital flight.
March (TBD)[41] India PSLV-CA India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India Cartosat-3 ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
March (TBD)[24] China Long March 3C / YZ-1 China Xichang China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M11 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
China BeiDou-3 M12 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
March (TBD)[24] China Landspace-1 Landspace Technology Corporation
 
March (TBD)[42] New Zealand Electron New Zealand Rocket Lab Launch Complex 1 United States Rocket Lab
United States ANDESITE Boston University Center for Space Physics Low Earth Earth observation  
United States CeREs NASA Low Earth Earth observation  
United States CHOMPTT NASA, UFL, Stanford University, KACST Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States CubeSail 1, 2 University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States Da Vinci North Idaho STEM Charter Academy Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States GeoStare Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States ISX NASA Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States NMTSat New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States RSat-P US Naval Academy Satellite Lab Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States Shields-1 NASA Highly elliptical Technology demonstration  
United States STF-1 NASA, VWU, WVSGC Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States TOMSat R³ (AeroCube 11) The Aerospace Corporation Low Earth Technology demonstration  
Launch for NASA's ELaNa program.
Q1 (TBD)[42] New Zealand Electron New Zealand Rocket Lab Launch Complex 1 United States Rocket Lab
United States MX-1E-1 Moon Express Low Earth[43] Lunar lander  
An entry to win the Google Lunar X Prize.[43]
Q1 (TBD)[44] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Luxembourg SES-12 SES S.A. Geosynchronous Communications  
Q1 (TBD)[14] India GSLV Mk II India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India GSAT-6A ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
Early 2018 (TBD)[45] United States LauncherOne United States Cosmic Girl, Mojave United States Virgin Galactic
United States To be announced Virgin Galactic TBA Flight test  
Maiden orbital flight.
Q1 (TBD)[24] China Long March 3B China China
Sri Lanka SupremeSat II  
Early 2018 (TBD)[14] United States Pegasus-XL Marshall Islands Stargazer, Kwajalein Atoll United States Orbital ATK
United States ICON NASA Low Earth Ionosphere research  
Q1 (TBD)[36] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-K 16 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Q1 (TBD)[36] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-K2 213 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  

April[edit]

2 April [14] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX
United States SpaceX CRS-14 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
6 April [14] Russia Rokot / Briz-KM Russia Plesetsk Site 133/3 European Union / Russia Eurockot
European Union Sentinel-3B ESA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
12 April[14] United States Atlas V 551 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States AFSPC-11 U.S. Air Force ? Communications (military)  
United States EAGLE[46] Air Force Research Laboratory ? Technology experiments (Space Test Program)  
14 April[14] United States Falcon 9 Block 5[48] United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
United States Iridium NEXT 51–55 Iridium Low Earth Communications  
Germany GRACE-FO 1, 2 DLR Low Earth Communications  
DLR arranged a rideshare of GRACE-FO on a Falcon 9 with Iridium following the cancellation of their Dnepr launch contract in 2015.[40] Iridium CEO Matt Desch disclosed in September 2017 that GRACE-FO would be launched on the sixth Iridium NEXT mission.[47] Possibly maiden flight of the Falcon 9 Block 5 variant.[48]
April (TBD)[14] European Union Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
India GSAT-11[49] ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
Azerbaijan Azerspace 2 /
United States Intelsat 38[50]
Azercosmos / Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications  

May[edit]

1 May[14] United States Antares 230 United States MARS LP-0A United States Orbital ATK
United States Cygnus CRS OA-9E NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
5 May[14] United States Atlas V 401 United States Vandenberg SLC-3E United States ULA
United States InSight NASA / JPL Heliocentric Mars lander  
12th mission of the Discovery program. Mars lander mission dedicated to geological and seismological studies of the planet.
May (TBD)[51] European Union Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
South Korea GEO-KOMPSAT-2A[a] KARI Geosynchronous Meteorology  
May (TBD)[52] United States Delta IV M+(4,2) United States Cape Canaveral SLC-37B United States ULA
United States GPS III A-1 U.S. Air Force Medium Earth Navigation  
Last flight of Delta IV M+(4,2) variant
May (TBD)[24] China Long March 3C / YZ-1 China Xichang China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M13 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
China BeiDou-3 M14 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  

June[edit]

6 June [14] Russia Soyuz-FG Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz MS-09 / 55S Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 56/57  
Manned flight with three cosmonauts
9 June[14] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States SpaceX CRS-15 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
June (TBD)[40] United States Falcon 9 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
United States Iridium NEXT 56-65 Iridium Low Earth Communications  
June (TBD)[53] United States Falcon 9 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
Argentina SAOCOM 1A[54] CONAE Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Brazil ITASAT-1 ITA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
June (TBD)[14] United States Falcon Heavy United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States STP-2 U.S. Air Force Geosynchronous Technology demo  
June (TBD)[24] China Long March 4C China Jiuquan or Taiyuan China CASC
China Chang'e 4 Relay CNSA Earth–Moon L2, halo orbit Communications  
China DSLWP-A1 CNSA Selenocentric, elliptical orbit Radio astronomy  
China DSLWP-A2 CNSA Selenocentric, elliptical orbit Radio astronomy  
The relay satellite will support communications from the Chang'e 4 rover exploring the far side of the Moon.
Q2 (TBD)[55] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Canada Telstar 18V[56] Telesat Geosynchronous Communications  
Q2 (TBD)[55] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Canada Telstar 19V[56] Telesat Geosynchronous Communications  
Q2 (TBD)[24] China Long March 5 China Wenchang LC-1 China CASC
China Shijian 18-02 CAST Geosynchronous Communications  
Q2 (TBD)[36] Russia Rokot / Briz-KM Russia Plesetsk Site 133/3 Russia RVSN RF
Russia Gonets-M 14[57] Gonets SatCom Low Earth Communications  
Russia Gonets-M 15 Gonets SatCom Low Earth Communications  
Russia Gonets-M 16 Gonets SatCom Low Earth Communications  
Russia BLITS-M Roscosmos Low Earth Laser ranging  
Q2 (TBD)[36] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-K 17 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  

July[edit]

10 July[14] Russia Soyuz-2.1a Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress MS-09 / 70P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
31 July
14:07[14]
United States Delta IV Heavy United States Cape Canaveral SLC-37B United States ULA
United States Parker Solar Probe NASA Heliocentric Heliophysics  
Heliophysics observation mission planned to make in situ studies of the Sun's outer corona at a perihelion distance of 8.5 solar radii (5.9 million kilometers) – the closest any spacecraft will come to the Sun to date.
July (TBD)[41] India PSLV-CA India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India Oceansat-3 ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Oceanography  
July (TBD)[58] United States Vector-R United States MARS LP-0B United States Vector Space Systems
TBD Low Earth (?) Flight test  
First orbital flight of Vector-R rocket.

August[edit]

27 August [14] United States Atlas V N22[59] United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States Boe-OFT Boeing / NASA Low Earth (ISS) Flight test  
Boeing Orbital Flight Test of CST-100 Starliner as part of Commercial Crew Development program. 30-day robotic mission.
August (TBD)[40] United States Falcon 9 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
United States Iridium NEXT 66-75 Iridium Low Earth Communications  
August (TBD)[61] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States SpX-DM1 SpaceX / NASA Low Earth (ISS) Flight test  
Crew Dragon Demo 1: Planned test of Dragon 2 as part of Commercial Crew Development program. Possibly maiden flight of the Falcon 9 Block 5 variant.[60]
August (TBD)[62] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Indonesia Telkom 4[63] Telkom Indonesia Geosynchronous Communications  
August (TBD)[14] Japan H-IIB Japan Tanegashima LA-Y2 Japan MHI
Japan HTV-7 JAXA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
August (TBD)[24] China Long March 3A China Xichang LA-2 China CASC
China BeiDou IGSO-7 CNSA IGSO Navigation  
August (TBD)[64] United States LauncherOne United States Cosmic Girl, Mojave United States Virgin Galactic
United States ALBus NASA Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States CACTUS-1 Capitol Technology University Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States CAPE-3 University of Louisiana Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States ExoCube-2 NASA Low Earth Atmospheric research  
United States INCA NMSU Low Earth Ionospheric research  
United States MicroMAS-2b MIT Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States MiTEE-1 University of Michigan Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States PICS 1, 2 Brigham Young University Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States PolarCube Colorado Space Grant Consortium Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States Q-PACE (Cu-PACE) UCF Low Earth Microgravity research  
United States RadFxSat-2 (Fox-1E) AMSAT Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States TechEdSat-7 (TES-7) SJSU, NASA, University of Idaho Low Earth Technology demonstration  
Launch for NASA's ELaNa program.

September[edit]

12 September[65] United States Delta II 7420 United States Vandenberg SLC-2W United States ULA
United States ICESat-2 NASA Low Earth Earth observation  
Last flight of Delta II series; final flight of the Thor rocket series.
14 September[14] Russia Soyuz-FG Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz MS-10 / 56S Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 57/58  
Manned flight with three cosmonauts
15 September[65] United States Delta IV Heavy United States Vandenberg SLC-6 United States United Launch Alliance
United States NROL-71 / Kennen NRO Low Earth Reconnaissance  
17 September[65] Russia Soyuz ST-A / Fregat-M France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
European Union MetOp-C Eumetsat Low Earth (SSO) Meteorology  
September(TBD)[24] China Long March 3C / YZ-1 China Xichang China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M15 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
China BeiDou-3 M16 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
Q3 (TBD)[66] European Union Ariane 5 ES France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
European Union Galileo FOC 19 ESA Medium Earth Navigation  
European Union Galileo FOC 20 ESA Medium Earth Navigation  
European Union Galileo FOC 21 ESA Medium Earth Navigation  
European Union Galileo FOC 22 ESA Medium Earth Navigation  
Third Galileo launch with Ariane 5 (10th overall), carrying Tara, Samuel, Anna, and Ellen.
Q3 (TBD)[67] United States Falcon 9 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
Canada RADARSAT Constellation[68] Canadian Space Agency Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Q3 (TBD)[24] China Long March 2C China TBD China CASC
China / France CFOSAT CNES / ? Low Earth Earth observation  
Q3 (TBD)[36] Russia Proton-M / DM-03 Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 81/24 Russia Khrunichev
Russia GLONASS-K 18 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Russia GLONASS-K 19 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Russia GLONASS-K 20 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  

October[edit]

5 October[citation needed] European Union Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
European Union Japan BepiColombo ESA / JAXA Mercurian orbit Mercury probes  
Third and final cornerstone mission of the Horizon 2000+ programme. Joint ESA / JAXA Mercury mission consisting of two orbiters, the ESA Mercury Planetary Orbiter and the JAXA Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter
11 October [14] Russia Soyuz-2.1a Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress MS-10 / 71P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
18 October[14] United States Atlas V 531 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States AEHF-4[69] U.S. Air Force Geosynchronous Communications (military)  

November[edit]

10 November[14] United States Delta IV M+(5,4) United States Cape Canaveral SLC-37B United States ULA
United States WGS-10 U.S. Air Force Geosynchronous Communications  
Last flight of "single stick" Delta IV M+[70]
8 November[71] United States Antares 230 United States MARS LP-0A United States Orbital ATK
United States Cygnus CRS OA-10E NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
15 November[36] Russia Soyuz-FG Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz MS-11 / 57S Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 58/59  
Manned flight with three cosmonauts
16 November[14] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States SpaceX CRS-16 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
November (TBD)[61] United States Atlas V N22[59] United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41